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Creating Your Logo

Posted on Dec 30, 2013 by in Advice | 0 comments

We all know logo design is a crucial part of the process for any new brand but few of us know exactly how to go about it. Where to start. We’ve put together our top five tips to help:-

Learn from the best – imitation is flattery after all

With the internet at your fingertips you’ve got access to pretty much every logo ever made. Use it. We are not suggesting you copy famous logos but you can certainly learn from them. Identify some you think are good and decide what it is you do – and don’t – like about them. It could be colours, style, font or just the tiniest detail. Yours might end up being very different but at the very least it might give you some ideas.

Have a brief – and a system for how you make decisions

Design is very subjective so if there are a few members of your team it’s unlikely every single one of them will like every single aspect of your logo. They might all have slightly different ideas about what will – and won’t – work. Make sure you all agree on a general brief before you start thrashing out the details so you’ve got something to start with. Do you want the logo to be elegant? Powerful? Symbolic? Do you want it to use an image or just words? What happens if one of you doesn’t like it? Do they have the right to veto? Logos are important and it wouldn’t be the first time one has caused an argument!

Pick your colours carefully

Deciding which colours you’d like to dominate your logo often helps. But it’s not always as simple as choosing red and white for example. There are many different shades of red that will give the logo a totally different feel. Annoyingly, there are even various shades of white. If you pick exact shades you are all happy with you are in a better position to start moving on towards the details.

Get your pen and paper out

Most people find it much easier drawing on paper than trying to construct something on the computer so it’s worth sharpening your pencil. Your logos might sound the same in conversation but look very different in your heads so it’s worth trying to get them down. Don’t be embarrassed if you aren’t a great artist, it’s purely a means of conveying your ideas and you’ve got unlimited attempts.

Ask colleagues, friends and customers

If you are barking up the wrong tree it’s much better to know about it before you’ve invested too much time and energy. As a result, getting some outside opinions is usually very helpful – but you must make them promise to be honest. If they are too afraid of hurting your feelings they will do more harm than good. But make sure you ask enough people – don’t overreact to one or two negative comments.

We hope these tips will help a bit but if there’s anything we can do to help please don’t hesitate to ask – that’s what we are here for after all!